Shady Shelter Business: NYC Audits Homeless Shelter Provider

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In an exclusive New York Daily News report, it has been disclosed that New York City is auditing Childrens Community Services, a homeless shelter provider that was granted $407 million in contracts from the City in June of 2017.

According to the New York Daily News, Childrens Community Services was granted the lucrative contracts to operate hotel shelters in New York City despite being a neophyte company that was formed only four years prior. It seems that the “nonprofit” company is currently in quite a fiscal pickle. Recent tax filings reportedly state that the company is “$6 million in the red.”

The New York Daily News states: “When the Daily News inquired about the nonprofit’s debts and murky financials, Homeless Services said it planned to procure an independent accounting firm to review Children Community Services and pare down the number of shelters the nonprofit operates.”

These are the types of dealings the City is engaging in in the midst of a homeless crisis? Who are the people making these decisions? Are there professional repercussions, and accountability, for those people’s actions? How will the City claw itself out of the homeless epidemic with going-ons like this?

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Brooklyn’s Massive K2 Overdose Reportedly Involves Some Shelter Residents

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News sources are stating that nearly 50 Brooklynites have overdosed on K2 over the past few days.

The overdoses reportedly happened in five different locations. NBC News lists the overdoses as having occurred at the following locations: “The area of Broadway and Myrtle saw 15 overdoses; Fulton Street and Alabama Avenue in East New York had 21; Ralph Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights, 7; Van Sinderen Avenue in Brownsville, 2; and Atlantic Avenue and Sackman Street, 4.”

The New York Daily News states that yesterday’s “rash of overdose victims came from the Renaissance Shelter at Ralph Ave. and Lincoln Place, witnesses said.” The New York Daily News also states that four people overdosed outside the Atlantic House Men’s Shelter in Brownsville.

**UPDATE: About 10 minutes ago, The Wall Street Journal reported that “K2 Overdose Tally Grows to 56 in Brooklyn.”

**SECOND UPDATE: The New York Times just reported: “The warnings on Tuesday [today] carried particular urgency for the city’s homeless population: Three shelters were among the five places identified as epicenters. The largest number of patients, 21, came from the Fulton House shelter in East New York.”

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: How Much Does It Cost To House A Homeless Person In A NYC Shelter?

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In a March 28, 2018, New York Post article entitled: “Ex-Deputy Mayor Enlisted To Help Fight The Homeless Shelter” the following is stated: “Department of Homeless Services officials [say] the average price to house [a homeless person] in [a] traditional shelter is about $54,000 per year.”

The average is $54,000 per bed, per year?! SMH! To put that in perspective, according to The Coalition For The Homeless, the number of homeless people living in New York City shelters in February 2018 was 63,343.

$54,000 x 63,343= $3,420,522,000

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: New York City Street Homeless

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The term, “street homeless,” is used to described homeless people who are not in the homeless shelter system, and instead live on the streets.

According to a recent New York Daily News article, the number of street homeless in New York City increased in 2017 by 39%. The article states that in 2016 there were 2,838 people in New York City who were street homeless. In 2017, that statistic skyrocketed to 3,936.

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The Homeless New Yorker Red Tape Quote Of The Week: The Queens Family Hotel Edition

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“Every New Yorker should be outraged at the incompetence and even cruelty at the Department of Homeless Services. These families and children are ripped from their homes at a moment’s notice, traumatized again because DHS is failing in every way to address homelessness.” -Jimmy Van Brammer (NYC Councilmember) on the sloppy, forced transition of homeless families from a Queens hotel shelter. [Source: NY Daily News]

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2 Newborn Babies Dead At 2 Different NYC Shelters

Saratoga Family Inn

It’s only approximately three weeks into 2018, and there has already been at least two deaths of newborn babies in two different New York City homeless shelters.

In both cases, the New York City Daily News states that the cause of death of the babies has not yet been determined.

On the first Wednesday of 2018, a baby living in a Queens shelter, Saratoga Family Inn, died. This is not the first time a baby has perished as this shelter. In 2004, a three-month old baby died at the shelter after being found unconscious. In 2003, twin babies also died at the shelter via suffocation.

Yesterday, according to the New York Daily News, a baby born at the Callaway Family Residence, a shelter for pregnant women located in the Bronx, died after he was found not breathing.

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NYC Governor Cuomo’s End Of The Year Remarks About Homelessness

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On the last day of 2017, Governor Andrew Cuomo was quoted as saying the following in regards to homelessness in New York City: “We have severe challenges next year. There is nothing we cannot do if we focus on it. It is our apathy that stops us from solving these problems. There is no reason you have homeless people on the street in 2018. There’s no reason, but you choose to do nothing about it.”

According to the New York Post, Governor Cuomo was directing his comments towards Mayor De Blasio. For quite some time it has seemed to appear that NYC’s mayor and governor have not seen eye-to-eye on more than a few issues (to put it mildly). However, in the meantime, the citizens of the city are suffering from the dearth of affordable housing, and the soaring rate of homelessness. According to the news source, The Patch, Federal tallies have the number of New York City’s homeless currently at about 76,000 people.

The questions remain: Who is going to fix the problem? How? When?

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