Upcoming Public Hearings Regarding New York Rent Laws

Medgar Evers College

New York’s rent laws are set to expire on June 15. Before this deadline, the NYS Senate Housing Committee is holding public hearings throughout the State to hear public testimony regarding tenant protection and rent regulations.

The upcoming hearings are as follows:

1) Thursday, May 16 (1PM-8PM) Medgar Evers College; 1650 Bedford Avenue; Brooklyn, New York 11225.
2) Wednesday, May 22 (1PM-8PM) Albany Legislative Office Building.
3)Thursday, May 23 (2:30PM- 8PM) Hudson Valley at the Newburgh Armory Unity Center; 321 South William Street; Newburgh, NY 12550.

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2 New Homeless Shelters To Come To Park Slope

2 New Park Slope Shelters

Tomorrow a meeting will be held at John Jay High School to address two new homeless shelters that are proposed to be opened in Park Slope before the end of 2019.

The meeting, which will be held at 237 7th Avenue, between 6:30 PM and 8:30 PM, will reportedly be attended by elected officials, representatives of the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS), and representatives of Women In Need (WIN).

The two shelters will be operated by WIN. According to The Bklyner, one shelter, proposed to be opened in September, will be a 148-unit shelter located at 535 4th Avenue. The other shelter, located at 555 4th Avenue, is proposed to be opened in November 2019. It will house 105 shelter units.

NYC is still seemingly attempting to solve its serious housing crisis by building new homeless shelters rather than turning available properties into affordable housing? I’m still unclear exactly what the city’s plan is here. What city official can accurately articulate the city’s affordable housing plan?

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Actress Susan Kelechi Watson On Brooklyn’s Gentrification

Susan Watson

Actress Susan Kelechi Watson had the following to say about the gentrification of Brooklyn in a recent New York Post interview:

“I don’t understand why there wasn’t the same investment in the community or the same investment in the prosperity of the community when the culture was majority Afro-Caribbean, Afro-American, when it was a majority of black culture. It becomes more opportune to invest when other cultures decide they want to live there. Or other cultures must live there because they are forced out of- let’s say, Manhattan. At the core level, that’s my problem with gentrification.

What I say is that there’s this culture and this vibe and this community in Brooklyn that’s so amazing and wonderful and it has influence on the world. That’s the part of Brooklyn that I love and I begin to miss. All these people who made Brooklyn, Brooklyn. When you’re from Brooklyn, you are the show, aren’t you?”

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New York City Transit To Implement A Zero Tolerance Homeless Policy

Homeless 34th Street

Last week, New York City’s Transit president told the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Board that he has directed station managers to kick out any homeless people who are lying down in the subway stations.

According to The New York Post, the NYC Transit president, Andy Byford, stated, “Having a seat and getting warm is fine, but I will not tolerate them leaving messes or laying across seats.”

Rebutting a board member who stated, “We need to be aware of the many reasons why people are homeless”; the New York Post reported that Mr. Byford “responded that he wasn’t going to let the homeless affect the comfort of his riders.”

The question is, how will this “zero tolerance” policy be implemented, and what will be the resulting effects?

As many New Yorkers are aware, the city’s housing crisis, along with other factors, has unfortunately turned the subway system into a makeshift homeless shelter at night, especially during the winter months. What will happen to the people who are seeking shelter in the subway station after they are expelled? Where will they go instead?

-The Homeless New Yorker

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There Are More Homeless Children In NYC Than There Are People In Albany

Kingsbridge High School

  • New York City public schools have 114,659 homeless students; a record high.
  • “New York City has one of the highest populations of homeless students of any big city in America.”
  • “There are more homeless students in New York City than people in Albany.”
  • “At 144 [New York City] public schools, a third of the children are homeless.”
  • “Tonight, about one out of every 10 students in New York City will sleep in a homeless shelter or in the homes of relatives.”
  • Last year was the third consecutive year the number of homeless New York City public school students exceeded 100,000.
  • “For every 1,660 homeless students, there’s roughly 1 social worker.”
  • “Some students have to travel through two or more boroughs to reach school from their shelters; only about half of the city’s homeless families lived in a shelter in the same borough where their youngest child attended school last year.”
  • District 10 in the Bronx has the most homeless children out of the city’s 32 districts.  It has 10,804 homeless students.
  • District 10 “includes Kingsbridge International High School, where about 44 percent of the students who attended the school over the last four years were homeless at one point.”
  • “Last year, students living in a shelter missed an average of about 30 days in the school year.”
  • Due to living challenges, homeless students are more likely to struggle at school.  In New York City, “in the 2015-16 school year, just 12 percent of students living in shelters passed the state math exam, and 15 percent passed English.”

[SOURCE: The New York Times]

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New York City’s Affordable Housing Crisis

homeless-new-yorker-city

Last week, New York City’s Comptroller Scott Stringer released “The Gap is Still Growing: New York City’s Continuing Housing Affordability Challenge” report. This report is a study of the state of housing in New York City.

According to AM NY: “The analysis found the city experienced a net loss of more than 425,000apartments renting for $900 or less from 2005 to 2017.”

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: The Staten Island Edition

HMLS New Yorker

According to a recent article published in news source Staten Island Live, approximately 1,300 Staten Islanders are homeless and residing in New York City homeless shelters. However, Staten Island itself, has only one homeless shelter.

Staten Island Live states that according to the Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the single Staten Island shelter only has the capacity to house 40 homeless families and 119 homeless people.

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Adjusting After Homelessness…It’s My Anniversary

Homeless With Dates Logo

A year ago, yesterday, I exited the New York City homeless shelter system. Being in the homeless shelter system was a life-changing experience for me. The New York City homeless shelter system seems to have a lot of similarities with the prison system. People who are in the homeless shelter system for a bevy of reasons, including upstanding citizens who have fell victim to New York City’s vicious cycle of gentrification, are treated like inmates; basically, dehumanized and “institutionalized.”

It’s a process to mentally, emotionally, and physically shake off the despicable trauma of the NYC homeless shelter system. When I read Wu Tang Klan’s U-God’s memoir, a passage in the tome regarding adjusting to life after incarceration reminded me of adjusting to life after being homeless.

Raw UGod

In his book, “Raw: My Journey Into The Wu-Tang,” U-God states: “You need about the same amount of time back in the world as you served in jail. If you did three years inside, you’re gonna need three years outside to get your head on straight. You have to catch up with the world that’s kept moving on while you’ve been separated from it. You aren’t just gonna walk out the gate and pick up your life right where you left off. You gotta readjust yourself, reestablish your routines, and above all, get used to the freedom of not being locked up, because that’s one of the biggest things every convict has to overcome.”

Despite the traumatic and extremely negative experiences I had in the NYC homeless shelter system, I appreciate what I learned and experienced there. My experiences in that system armed me with a effective and potent tool for helping others. I will never forget what I experienced, and I will not stop speaking out about it until things are changed, and greater numbers of people are helped.

To commemorate my anniversary, I have set some new personal goals. Me and my husband will also go to a shelter this weekend and give back, directly, to the people.

Lots of Love,

-The Homeless New Yorker

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: How Much Does It Cost To House A Homeless Person In A NYC Shelter?

HMLS New Yorker Blue Logo

In a March 28, 2018, New York Post article entitled: “Ex-Deputy Mayor Enlisted To Help Fight The Homeless Shelter” the following is stated: “Department of Homeless Services officials [say] the average price to house [a homeless person] in [a] traditional shelter is about $54,000 per year.”

The average is $54,000 per bed, per year?! SMH! To put that in perspective, according to The Coalition For The Homeless, the number of homeless people living in New York City shelters in February 2018 was 63,343.

$54,000 x 63,343= $3,420,522,000

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