Homeless Mathematics: 2 Months, 1 Week, and 2 Days

HMLS New Yorker

It took 2 months, 1 week, and 2 days to get my file from the Department of Homeless Services (DHS). I made the request for my DHS file through an attorney; however, it still took an inordinate amount of time for DHS to release my file. I was told that using an attorney would get me my file in approximately 2 weeks. That clearly didn’t happen. [SIDEBAR: When I got my file, it was extremely light compared to the documents that I have accumulated; not to mention the straight-up lies some administrators wrote into my file.]

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The Face You Make When Your DHS File Is FULL Of Lies And Omissions

Prince Head Shake

This is exactly why I advise every shelter resident to keep copious notes. SMH!! [SIDEBAR: There’s no way a person who is struggling under the strain of homelessness should have to, or be able to, keep better, and more accurate documentation, than whole staffs of people who get paid taxpayers’ money to provide “professional” services. SMH!] Integrity and efficiency issues seem to proliferate in an agency that is supposed to help people in need; the paperwork substantiates this. SMH!

-The Homeless New Yorker

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: Homeless Family Composition & Employment Rates

HMLS New Yorker

I got the following statistics from charts and graphs contained in a report recently released by the City of New York entitled, “Turning the Tide on Homelessness in New York City.”

Families with children- 63%
Adult Families- 7%
Single Adults- 29%

Current Employment Rate of Shelter Residents (as of 12/2/16): (Please note that these statistics may be based on the head of household solely. Therefore, they may exclude other working homeless New Yorkers.)

Families with children- Approximately 42%
Adult families- Approximately 29%
Single adults- Approximately 18%

The “Turning the Tide on Homelessness in New York City” report also states: “A substantial number of people in shelters are working adults who cannot afford to rent an apartment given their incomes.”

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