Shady Shelter Business: NYC Audits Homeless Shelter Provider

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In an exclusive New York Daily News report, it has been disclosed that New York City is auditing Childrens Community Services, a homeless shelter provider that was granted $407 million in contracts from the City in June of 2017.

According to the New York Daily News, Childrens Community Services was granted the lucrative contracts to operate hotel shelters in New York City despite being a neophyte company that was formed only four years prior. It seems that the “nonprofit” company is currently in quite a fiscal pickle. Recent tax filings reportedly state that the company is “$6 million in the red.”

The New York Daily News states: “When the Daily News inquired about the nonprofit’s debts and murky financials, Homeless Services said it planned to procure an independent accounting firm to review Children Community Services and pare down the number of shelters the nonprofit operates.”

These are the types of dealings the City is engaging in in the midst of a homeless crisis? Who are the people making these decisions? Are there professional repercussions, and accountability, for those people’s actions? How will the City claw itself out of the homeless epidemic with going-ons like this?

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Brooklyn’s Massive K2 Overdose Reportedly Involves Some Shelter Residents

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News sources are stating that nearly 50 Brooklynites have overdosed on K2 over the past few days.

The overdoses reportedly happened in five different locations. NBC News lists the overdoses as having occurred at the following locations: “The area of Broadway and Myrtle saw 15 overdoses; Fulton Street and Alabama Avenue in East New York had 21; Ralph Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights, 7; Van Sinderen Avenue in Brownsville, 2; and Atlantic Avenue and Sackman Street, 4.”

The New York Daily News states that yesterday’s “rash of overdose victims came from the Renaissance Shelter at Ralph Ave. and Lincoln Place, witnesses said.” The New York Daily News also states that four people overdosed outside the Atlantic House Men’s Shelter in Brownsville.

**UPDATE: About 10 minutes ago, The Wall Street Journal reported that “K2 Overdose Tally Grows to 56 in Brooklyn.”

**SECOND UPDATE: The New York Times just reported: “The warnings on Tuesday [today] carried particular urgency for the city’s homeless population: Three shelters were among the five places identified as epicenters. The largest number of patients, 21, came from the Fulton House shelter in East New York.”

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HMLS New Yorker Inspirational Quote

Will Smith

“The question isn’t, ‘Can you handle the situation?’ The question is, ‘Can you handle your mind?’ Can you handle the thoughts and the emotions that are trying to poison your progress? Forget managing the situation, manage your mind; Training your mind to sit calmly in the edge of the storm.” -Will Smith

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Homeless New Yorker Stat: How Much Does It Cost To House A Homeless Person In A NYC Shelter?

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In a March 28, 2018, New York Post article entitled: “Ex-Deputy Mayor Enlisted To Help Fight The Homeless Shelter” the following is stated: “Department of Homeless Services officials [say] the average price to house [a homeless person] in [a] traditional shelter is about $54,000 per year.”

The average is $54,000 per bed, per year?! SMH! To put that in perspective, according to The Coalition For The Homeless, the number of homeless people living in New York City shelters in February 2018 was 63,343.

$54,000 x 63,343= $3,420,522,000

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Race, Money & Gentrification

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“There’s an obvious irony to the fact that even as race was key to the ‘white flight’ of the 1960s and ‘70s- both via redlining and the suburban covenant that excluded non-whites- it’s arguably just as central to the return of a new generation of white urban immigrants to neighborhoods that, in many cases, their own parents and grandparents abandoned. (‘My parents couldn’t believe I was moving to Brooklyn- they worked so hard to get out of there!’ is a common twenty-first century urban pioneer tale.) Viewed this way, both white flight and white return are two sides of the same coin. Those privileged by money and skin color getting to choose where to live- and who to live with- while those who are not so privileged have to take whatever’s left for them.” – From, “The Brooklyn Wars: The Stories Behind The Remaking Of New York’s Most Celebrated Borough” By: Neil DeMause

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The Major NYC Issue Left Out Of The Mayor’s Breakfast Club Interview

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On April 5, 2018, New York City Mayor, Bill De Blasio and his wife Chirlaine McCray, appeared on The Breakfast Club, a New York based morning radio show. The syndicated radio show is popular among New Yorkers, and the youth demographic. Their interviews have garnered millions of views on You Tube.

During the almost hour-long Breakfast Club interview, the mayor and the first lady talked politics, and about a bevy of issues affecting New Yorkers. I watched the You Tube video of the interview on the edge of my seat, hoping to hear the mayor address the city’s record-breaking homelessness issue. However, during the interview, the word “homeless” never came up. I was surprised that the issue was not mentioned at all.

All any New Yorker has to do is ride the subway, especially at night, to get a good visual on how out of control the homelessness problem is in New York City. In addition to this, news sources across the country are constantly reporting on New York City’s current homeless problem surpassing the levels of homelessness during The Great Depression.

The Breakfast Club morning show is a huge platform in New York. It was an opportunity for the mayor to speak to a large audience of New Yorkers about the things that concern them daily. Why was the issue of homelessness COMPLETELY ignored?

The mayor and the first lady, and the radio show’s three hosts didn’t mention NYC’s housing crisis, the record-breaking homeless statistics, or gentrification once during the entire interview. The word “housing” was never even uttered.

I was sitting there watching like:

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SMH!
How does the city’s mayor go on arguably one of the city’s biggest communication platforms and fail to address such an important topic?

-The Homeless New Yorker

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